Metal splinters, helicopters with umbrella and PVC voices

EXTRUSION [2010]
8-channel tape piece
Ángel Arranz

‘Everything is curved’. So did my dear colleague Casper Schipper define his first listening to Extrusion, the second electronic piece from a series of four works, which I expect to finish in 2011. Maybe it is because of my renewed interest in Baroque aesthetics, maybe because of a more aware use of the spatial/temporal qualities of the materials, certainly it results in a more flexible approach to time than even in my previous electronic piece, Electronic Study. The piece was composed thinking about the features of the space in which it has been premiered, the Schoenbergzaal of the Royal Conservatory of The Hague. To a certain extent, in Extrusion sounds seem to be closer to the limits of the space they inhabit. I have always found especially suitable the apparently austere concavities of the Schoenbergzaal, an architectural compound of solid bricks and wood. In order to develop spatial gestures of sounds in a physical way, the hall is not hugely big as a large concert hall, but long and wide –and high- enough as to magnify some sonic gestures, which draw a completely new impression of the space fed by the music. So, space becomes a sort of instrument just in the moment when you try to modify the perceptions that the audience have about it in a virtual way along a deconstructed timeline.
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Two interviews with Paul Berg and Kees Tazelaar

Indeed, this is a special event for sonologists, musicologists, composers and in general for lovers of electronic music. Two interviews with Paul Berg and Kees Tazelaar repectively have been published by the composer and musicologist Ángel Arranz. These interviews were realized during 2009 within the framework of the Institute of Sonology of The Hague.

The first interview covers one singular route of one of the pioneers on computer music. Paul Berg teaches at the Institute of Sonology computer music and algorithmic composition. This interview explores a personal path from the origin of computer programming applied to electronic music towards the most recent computational environments. This knowledge crystallized in AC Toolbox, a computer program on algorithmic composition designed by him. The text describes Paul Berg’s experience through his own words, which makes this document even more invaluable. A certain amount of synchronous subjects are unfolded step-to-step as a sort of algorithm, metaphorically speaking, from the seventies until now.

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