Metal splinters, helicopters with umbrella and PVC voices

EXTRUSION [2010]
8-channel tape piece
Ángel Arranz

‘Everything is curved’. So did my dear colleague Casper Schipper define his first listening to Extrusion, the second electronic piece from a series of four works, which I expect to finish in 2011. Maybe it is because of my renewed interest in Baroque aesthetics, maybe because of a more aware use of the spatial/temporal qualities of the materials, certainly it results in a more flexible approach to time than even in my previous electronic piece, Electronic Study. The piece was composed thinking about the features of the space in which it has been premiered, the Schoenbergzaal of the Royal Conservatory of The Hague. To a certain extent, in Extrusion sounds seem to be closer to the limits of the space they inhabit. I have always found especially suitable the apparently austere concavities of the Schoenbergzaal, an architectural compound of solid bricks and wood. In order to develop spatial gestures of sounds in a physical way, the hall is not hugely big as a large concert hall, but long and wide –and high- enough as to magnify some sonic gestures, which draw a completely new impression of the space fed by the music. So, space becomes a sort of instrument just in the moment when you try to modify the perceptions that the audience have about it in a virtual way along a deconstructed timeline.
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Ángel Arranz: composer, sonologist and musicologist

We would like to announce the release of the website of the composer Ángel Arranz.

Ángel Arranz [1976] is a Spanish composer who lives and works in The Netherlands as an associate researcher at the Institute of Sonology of The Hague. His music explores hybridization between acoustical instruments and electronics, spatiality in several plans of the musical realization and multi-instrumental assemblage. As a sort of mental territories, his music explores basically the utilization of time as a constructional matter through applied mathematics. He has developed an interesting algorithmic composition environment based on the utilization of waveforms [also named ‘seeds’], which work as controllers of the musical parameters, being used in turn to control the field where instruments are written. Seeds control the smallest aspects of the composition as well as the most general structures.

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